Early detection of prostate cancer should not be a postcode lottery

New statistics have revealed a worrying rise in untreated cancer patients, with a 16% drop in urgent cancer referrals made by GPs between March last year and January this year, compared to the same period the year before. The concern here is that prostate cancer may well be detected later, at a more advanced stage, which will affect health outcomes and quality of life. 

In the below comment, Saheed Rashid, Managing Director of BXTAccelyon highlights that it is now more urgent than ever that men are encouraged to get themselves checked.

Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer amongst British men, yet unlike the female equivalent – breast cancer – there is no automatic screening. Many men have to request the prostate cancer blood test, or PSA test, themselves. And in some cases are even advised against this.

Yet, many men may not experience any symptoms of prostate cancer at all. Others often associate a key symptom – the need to urinate more frequently – with ageing.

One of the bi-products of the Covid-19 pandemic is that people are less likely to see their GP for “unnecessary” health checks. New statistics have revealed a worrying rise in untreated cancer patients, with a 16% drop in urgent cancer referrals made by GPs between March last year and January this year, compared to the same period the year before. The concern here is that prostate cancer may well be detected later, at a more advanced stage, which will affect health outcomes and quality of life.

It is now more urgent than ever that men are encouraged to get themselves checked.

Indeed, as per the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines, the PSA test should be automatically offered to all men over 50 (and those over 45 if there is a history of prostate cancer and men of African-American descent) as regular screening.

Let’s stop relying on a man’s own initiative or a postcode lottery.